Day trading margin - Fidelity

b0x ICO Review - Decentralized Margin Trading - Spreadsheet ICO Review O...

b0x ICO Review - Decentralized Margin Trading - Spreadsheet ICO Review O... submitted by HappyMoneyMan to ico [link] [comments]

I spent the last 6 weeks playing all 13 main series Pokémon games. Here's my experiences

Some of you may remember me. Most of you probably don't. I made a post about it six weeks ago, which you can find here, about how I was gonna play 13 of the main series Pokémon games within six weeks, which I did. I was gonna make weekly updates, but they got automatically removed for some reason, so that's fun
So what I'm gonna do now is the biggest part of this whole 'project.' I'm gonna summarize exactly 306 hours and 35 minutes of gameplay within one reddit post. And if you're wondering how I know the exact times, I made a Google Sheet to document my journey, which you can see here, if you want all the boring numbers. If you don't want my summary of every single game, just scroll down to the bottom, where I'll share my thoughts about the whole ordeal. So let's get started on this, shall we?

BLUE

Honestly, I enjoyed Blue a lot more than I thought I would, even though the flaws of Gen 1 were hard to ignore. And may I say, thank god for LP compilers and podcasts, because 95% of the time I was playing Blue and Crystal, I was listening to something else. There's only so much beep-boop music one man can take. Overall, it was a great start to this journey. Some miscellaneous notes I took while playing:
The team I used: Venusaur, Golem, Alakazam, Ninetales, Vaporeon, Snorlax

CRYSTAL

Crystal was where the... difficulties of this challenge started coming up. I actually started Crystal on July 6th, just after capturing Mewtwo, and I played up to beating Bugsy. Unfortunately, I stayed up way too late, and woke up with a massive headache. So I spent most of the next day unwinding and mentally preparing myself for what's coming up. The rest of the game wasn't too difficult... until the 10th. I wanted to stay on a '1 game per 3 days' schedule, and this was the last day for Crystal, and I was just started on the Pokemon League. I was a little underleveled, so I spent the first half of my day repeatedly grinding up farther and farther up until I beat Lance on my 5th or 6th attempt. So I had to speed through all the Kanto section to stay on track. Which I did, to my amazement. I beat all the Kanto gyms super fast, and managed to get to Red... and immediately got slamjammed by his Pikachu
So this lead me to a question: 'when can I stop playing a game?' So I made this rule: Once I've beaten the Champion and the credits roll, I'm free to move on to the next game as I please. This is the hard rule I'm gonna adhere to. I don't want this to become stressful or a job, so I'm making this rule for my own sanity
That all out of the way, here's a few notes I took while playing:
The team I used: Typhlosion, Gengar, Slowking, Forretress (aka the mistake), Umbreon, Dragonair

EMERALD

If I had to create a line graph detailing my enjoyment of Emerald, it would be a line steadily going up... until Flannery, then just a slow painful crawl down to the end. I can't place an exact reason why, but this was the only game I played that I've actively disliked playing through. If I had to hazard a guess, I'd say it's because the RNG of Pokemon finally broke me. If there's one lesson I took out of this, it's that you can NEVER chance it on Sleep/Paralysis/Confusion not working. If you wanna work past them, you just heal. And if you inflict it on an enemy, it just won't work. I know it sounds like I'm exaggerating for comedic effect, but this was way too true for me. And the critical hits in this game were maybe the worst yet, even more so than gen 1, although I realize that might've just been me
I ended up using Rayquaza to speed through the Elite Four, because I was just genuinely exhausted of this game, and I did not want to try grinding through it. I'm gonna try to avoid using legendaries, but if I have to, I'm not gonna feel sorry about it
That being said, here's some various extra notes:
The team I used: Swampert, Gardevoir, Breloom, Torkoal, Skarmory, Rayquaza

FIRE RED

This game was a lot easier to play through than Emerald, fortunately, although I don't have a lot more to say. It was pretty fun, but my Blue playthrough might've been more enjoyable due to my choices in team members. I decided against capturing all the legendaries this time around, with one exception. I captured Articuno to replace my Fearow for the Pokemon League, since they were long outclassed by this point, and I couldn't cheese my way through Lance with poison-types this time. Still, my Fearow did better than the useless Forretress, so I still appreciate them. Overall, it felt like my Blue playthrough, except slightly worse. But it was still better than Emerald, so I won't complain
That's pretty much all I have to say, so time for some extra points:
The team I used: Charizard, Fearow, Gyarados, Vileplume, Dugtrio, Magneton, Articuno

PLATINUM

So this is my favorite Pokémon game, so I really tried to be impartial about it and treat it the same as the others... which didn't work, since it was the game I spent the most time on and explored the most in. Whoops! But I'm not ashamed; this was the best region out of everything I played. Honestly, I'm glad to know that my joy for this game wasn't just misplaced nostalgia, and still holds up to today. Although it was really unfortunate that I was having technical issues that I had to devote a lot of time to dealing with, otherwise I could've probably beaten this game in three/three and half days. I'll go into more details in the SoulSilver section.
So here's some notes about my experience:
The team I used: Torterra, Staraptor, Gastrodon, Bronzong, Garchomp, Porygon-Z

SOULSILVER

If I had to rank my favorite Pokémon games, SoulSilver would be in the top 5, only just below Platinum. So it sucks that my house was suffering internet outages (around the 19th-24th) while I was supposed to be playing this game. And since gen 4 is the slowest of all the games, that DOUBLY sucks. So I had to devote valuable time to fixing that, and ended up not getting to play the Kanto section of this game. That sucks, but since I already went through this with Crystal, so I'm not too fussed. Other than the circumstances, this wasn't too different from Crystal, although my team choices were a lot better
Yada, yada, yada, notes:
The team I used: Feraligatr, Ampharos, Togekiss, Houndoom, Exeggcutor, Mamoswine

WHITE & WHITE 2

(I'm combining the two because I don't have a lot to say about them individually)
So as a child, I really disliked White, because I was a child who couldn't appreciate how much effort was put into them, and I was upset I couldn't use any of my old favorites. But as an adult, I can really understand the work behind it, or at least behind White 1. Although I still say the lack of options in White 1 is a major downside, since anybody who's not challenging themselves are gonna have some combination of the same 15-ish Pokémon on the story campaign. But while the 2nd game has a better Pokémon choice, the story is also factually worse, so pick your poison. But back to the point, I really enjoyed these games. A lot more than I did when I was younger, anyways
So here's my extra notes; two for each game:
(White)
(White 2)
The team I used for White 1: Serperior, Swoobat, Excadrill, Scolipede, Carracosta, Chandelure
The team I used for White 2: Emboar, Azumarill, Crobat, Sigilyph, Sawsbuck, Escavalier

X

A lot of my friends consider X/Y some of the worst games in the franchise, and while they may have a point, I still enjoy them a lot more than... another title we'll be talking about later. Personally, I think the gameplay is pretty much a straight upgrade from Black/White, although the story... UGH. Easily the worst. Especially Team Flare. I could make an entire post about them, but to simplify: They're a team all about style, yet their admins are way too overdesigned and forgettable to make a point. Instead of the cold uniformity of Team Galactic or the easily understood motives of Team Plasma, they're just a hot mess whose admins are completely forgettable. And Lysandre is just President Rose, but more obviously a villain and somehow more overdramatic
I had a loooooot of notes about this game, mostly about Team Flare, but here's what I condensed it down to:
The team I used: Chesnaught, Talonflame, Florges, Meowstic, Barbaracle, Goodra

OMEGA RUBY

(So a quick preface, I actually played Ultra Moon before Omega Ruby, since the cartridge I had was corrupted, so I played UM while I waited for my new cart to arrive. Just thought I'd mention it)
So Alpha Sapphire was is in the top 5 games for me, alongside Platinum and SoulSilver. Which is why I'm kinda surprised that this is the game I spent the least time on (17 hours, 18 minutes), being one of the two games I spent less than 20 hours on. Which is absolutely strange to me, since I spent at least an hour grabbing useful TMs for the Elite Four and getting Heart Scales to remember moves, so it really should be higher. Whatever, what about the gameplay? Well, it was like Emerald, but the exact opposite, since I actually really enjoyed it. I don't have much else to say except Pelipper, Zangoose, and Cacturne were all surprisingly fun team members. Seriously, Cacturne might be my new favorite grass-type
Extra notes, blah blah blah:
The team I used was: Blaziken, Pelipper, Manectric, Aggron, Zangoose, Cacturne

ULTRA MOON

So I originally promised to play Sun and Ultra Sun in my original post, but some circumstances led me to cut it down to Ultra Moon. More details can be read about it in the Google Sheet, but trust me, I have my reasons. I decided to play the Ultra version because the bonus versions of the games are supposed to be the "definitive version" of the games. Not sure if I agree on that, since there's basically no difference between Sun and Moon and USUM, and what is different is sometimes worse than what it was. This isn't the time or place to review these games, but if you ever want to replay the Alola games, pick up Sun or Moon, and avoid USUM. As for my experience... I dunno, it was ok. I liked my team, had a few challenges, yeah yeah yeah. Look, this is like the 10th or 11th game I played, this whole thing's become routine at this point
But at least I got a few notes to add:
The team I used: Primarina, Lopunny, Alolan Muk, Ribombee, Alolan Marowak, Lurantis, Metagross

LET'S GO, EEVEE

UUGGHHHH. This is my least favorite game. I insisted on playing it, since it was technically a main series game, and that was a mistake. I forgot how hand-holding this game was. If you don't know what I'm talking about here's my example:
In the original games, you could immediately go from Lavender Town to Celadon, and then go into the Rocket base, no problem. Here, you have to go up the tower, see that there's ghosts, and then leave the tower (which to my knowledge, no other dungeon in Pokémon ever does) then go see Jessie and James talk out loud about the ROCKET HIDEOUT in the CELADON GAMES CORNER. Then when you get there, you can get close to them, and they'll talk out loud about the HIDDEN HIDEOUT with the SWITCH BEHIND THE POSTER
Also, the gym requirement thing is just dumb. The fact that the game requires you to have a grass/water-type to fight Brock or have a Pokémon at least level 45 before fighting Sabrina is insane, and makes it nearly impossible to lose. And Koga's requirement of catching 50 unique Pokémon is uniquely cruel in a game where there's only 150-ish Pokémon available, especially to people like me who just like to capture a core team and stop catching unique Pokémon
Even besides those, the catching mechanic was broken. Seriously, it was terrible. I had to throw the ball at a 90-degree angle to throw the ball at a target just a little off to the side. One time, I tossed the controller upwards to throw the ball, and it was a perfect throw. Uggghh, I don't even wanna talk about my experience, I just want to complain. So whatever, I'm moving on, no notes this time
The team I used: Eevee, Victreebel, Mr. Mime, Rhydon, Starmie, Magmar

SHIELD

I'll admit, I enjoyed this game more than I thought I would. Maybe it's just because it WASN'T Let's Go, or because it was so easy to grind up levels with wild area candies. Either way, this was my second-fastest game played, clocking in at exactly 20 hours played. If I devoted myself to it, I could've beaten this in two days. But since I've got nothing much else to talk about, I'd like to discuss the stories of these games. Because I think I've found the perfect metaphor for these "Poképlots." It's like there's a good story somewhere in there, but half of it we're told to stay out of because we're not adults, and the other half of the plot was ripped out of a better story and painstakingly refitted into the Poképlot format. And if you're wondering why I'm talking so much about the stories, it's because that's the only thing meaningfully different about these games at this point
Alright, one last set of notes:
The team I used: Inteleon, Boltund, Tsareena, Centiskorch, Perrserker, Grimmsnarl

CONCLUSION

So I ended up completing my challenge, but what was the point of this whole thing? Well, I wanted to try and revive my love for the Pokémon franchise, since the past few games have really burned me out on the series. So, did I accomplish that?
Yeah! Despite all the hard times and frustrating moments, this was actually really fun. I feel like I should hate Pokémon now, since I've literally spent the last month and a half doing nothing but playing the games, but no. I came out of this whole challenge with a greater enjoyment of the series and a few new favorite Pokémon. So... mission accomplished! Although I don't think I'm gonna play any Pokémon games until the Sinnoh remakes come out (whenever that happens). I'm not burned out, but I think I need some time away at this point
So... that's it. I'm done. It's over. Feels free to reply about how right/wrong I am with my opinions. Thank you for coming to my TED Talk
EDIT: I'm glad this blew up, all the discussions I've been having have been super interesting, especially since we're talking about literally any Pokémon game right now. Thanks for making this post so incredible with your replies, guys. I'm happy my experiment was so interesting to read about
submitted by ThePigeonManLyon to pokemon [link] [comments]

How do you manage lots of trades? Any trading journal or spreadsheets?

I trade a lot and often have 3 instances of TOS open with multiple accounts and literally 100 or more positions at any time. I have a challenge managing all of them. I find the Account statement tab to be sort of useful but I have a hard time managing it all.
The only way to keep track of my trades is the Notes field but that's pretty 1999 tech here in 2020.
What do people use here to manage their trades? Trading journal software? Spreadsheets? Airtable? Other?
For instance I buy an option of XYZ because I read an event may happen in 3 weeks so I should pay attention the day before to assess, I would LOVE to be able to EASILY put that somewhere so I can see it and act and remember why I bought the option. Many other similar cases like that too.
I'd love to hear some ideas, TOS is like a giant swiss army knife of trading but its weak on this area.
submitted by Brains4Fun to thinkorswim [link] [comments]

How the TFSA works

(Updated August 9th, 2020)

Background


You may have heard about off-shore tax havens of questionable legality where wealthy people invest their money in legal "grey zones" and don't pay any tax, as featured for example, in Netflix's drama, The Laundromat.

The reality is that the Government of Canada offers 100% tax-free investing throughout your life, with unlimited withdrawals of your contributions and profits, and no limits on how much you can make tax-free. There is also nothing to report to the Canada Revenue Agency. Although Britain has a comparable program, Canada is the only country in the world that offers tax-free investing with this level of power and flexibility.

Thank you fellow Redditors for the wonderful Gold Award and Today I Learned Award!

(Unrelated but Important Note: I put a link at the bottom for my margin account explainer. Many people are interested in margin trading but don't understand the math behind margin accounts and cannot find an explanation. If you want to do margin, but don't know how, click on the link.)

As a Gen-Xer, I wrote this post with Millennials in mind, many of whom are getting interested in investing in ETFs, individual stocks, and also my personal favourite, options. Your generation is uniquely positioned to take advantage of this extremely powerful program at a relatively young age. But whether you're in your 20's or your 90's, read on!

Are TFSAs important? In 2020 Canadians have almost 1 trillion dollars saved up in their TFSAs, so if that doesn't prove that pennies add up to dollars, I don't know what does. The TFSA truly is the Great Canadian Tax Shelter.

I will periodically be checking this and adding issues as they arise, to this post. I really appreciate that people are finding this useful. As this post is now fairly complete from a basic mechanics point of view, and some questions are already answered in this post, please be advised that at this stage I cannot respond to questions that are already covered here. If I do not respond to your post, check this post as I may have added the answer to the FAQs at the bottom.

How to Invest in Stocks


A lot of people get really excited - for good reason - when they discover that the TFSA allows you to invest in stocks, tax free. I get questions about which stocks to buy.

I have made some comments about that throughout this post, however; I can't comprehensively answer that question. Having said that, though, if you're interested in picking your own stocks and want to learn how, I recommmend starting with the following videos:

The first is by Peter Lynch, a famous American investor in the 80's who wrote some well-respected books for the general public, like "One Up on Wall Street." The advice he gives is always valid, always works, and that never changes, even with 2020's technology, companies and AI:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRMpgaBv-U4&t=2256s


The second is a recording of a university lecture given by investment legend Warren Buffett, who expounds on the same principles:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MHIcabnjrA

Please note that I have no connection to whomever posted the videos.

Introduction


TFSAs were introduced in 2009 by Stephen Harper's government, to encourage Canadians to save.

The effect of the TFSA is that ordinary Canadians don't pay any income or capital gains tax on their securities investments.

Initial uptake was slow as the contribution rules take some getting used to, but over time the program became a smash hit with Canadians. There are about 20 million Canadians with TFSAs, so the uptake is about 70%- 80% (as you have to be the age of majority in your province/territory to open a TFSA).

Eligibility to Open a TFSA


You must be a Canadian resident with a valid Social Insurance Number to open a TFSA. You must be at the voting age in the province in which you reside in order to open a TFSA, however contribution room begins to accumulate from the year in which you turned 18. You do not have to file a tax return to open a TFSA. You do not need to be a Canadian citizen to open and contribute to a TFSA. No minimum balance is required to open a TFSA.

Where you Can Open a TFSA


There are hundreds of financial institutions in Canada that offer the TFSA. There is only one kind of TFSA; however, different institutions offer a different range of financial products. Here are some examples:


Insurance


Your TFSA may be covered by either CIFP or CDIC insuranceor both. Ask your bank or broker for details.

What You Can Trade and Invest In


You can trade the following:


What You Cannot Trade


You cannot trade:

Again, if it requires a margin account, it's out. You cannot buy on margin in a TFSA. Nothing stopping you from borrowing money from other sources as long as you stay within your contribution limits, but you can't trade on margin in a TFSA. You can of course trade long puts and calls which give you leverage.

Rules for Contribution Room


Starting at 18 you get a certain amount of contribution room.

According to the CRA:
You will accumulate TFSA contribution room for each year even if you do not file an Income Tax and Benefit Return or open a TFSA.
The annual TFSA dollar limit for the years 2009 to 2012 was $5,000.
The annual TFSA dollar limit for the years 2013 and 2014 was $5,500.
The annual TFSA dollar limit for the year 2015 was $10,000.
The annual TFSA dollar limit for the years 2016 to 2018 was $5,500.
The annual TFSA dollar limit for the year 2019 is $6,000.
The TFSA annual room limit will be indexed to inflation and rounded to the nearest $500.
Investment income earned by, and changes in the value of TFSA investments will not affect your TFSA contribution room for the current or future years.

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/tax-free-savings-account/contributions.html
If you don't use the room, it accumulates indefinitely.

Trades you make in a TFSA are truly tax free. But you cannot claim the dividend tax credit and you cannot claim losses in a TFSA against capital gains whether inside or outside of the TFSA. So do make money and don't lose money in a TFSA. You are stuck with the 15% withholding tax on U.S. dividend distributions unlike the RRSP, due to U.S. tax rules, but you do not pay any capital gains on sale of U.S. shares.

You can withdraw *both* contributions *and* capital gains, no matter how much, at any time, without penalty. The amount of the withdrawal (contributions+gains) converts into contribution room in the *next* calendar year. So if you put the withdrawn funds back in the same calendar year you take them out, that burns up your total accumulated contribution room to the extent of the amount that you re-contribute in the same calendar year.

Examples


E.g. Say you turned 18 in 2016 in Alberta where the age of majority is 18. It is now sometime in 2020. You have never contributed to a TFSA. You now have $5,500+$5,500+$5,500+$6,000+$6,000 = $28,500 of room in 2020. In 2020 you manage to put $20,000 in to your TFSA and you buy Canadian Megacorp common shares. You now have $8,500 of room remaining in 2020.

Sometime in 2021 - it doesn't matter when in 2021 - your shares go to $100K due to the success of the Canadian Megacorp. You also have $6,000 worth of room for 2021 as set by the government. You therefore have $8,500 carried over from 2020+$6,000 = $14,500 of room in 2021.

In 2021 you sell the shares and pull out the $100K. This amount is tax-free and does not even have to be reported. You can do whatever you want with it.

But: if you put it back in 2021 you will over-contribute by $100,000 - $14,500 = $85,500 and incur a penalty.

But if you wait until 2022 you will have $14,500 unused contribution room carried forward from 2021, another $6,000 for 2022, and $100,000 carried forward from the withdrawal 2021, so in 2022 you will have $14,500+$6,000+$100,000 = $120,500 of contribution room.

This means that if you choose, you can put the $100,000 back in in 2022 tax-free and still have $20,500 left over. If you do not put the money back in 2021, then in 2022 you will have $120,500+$6,000 = $126,500 of contribution room.

There is no age limit on how old you can be to contribute, no limit on how much money you can make in the TFSA, and if you do not use the room it keeps carrying forward forever.

Just remember the following formula:

This year's contribution room = (A) unused contribution room carried forward from last year + (B) contribution room provided by the government for this year + (C) total withdrawals from last year.

EXAMPLE 1:

Say in 2020 you never contributed to a TFSA but you were 18 in 2009.
You have $69,500 of unused room (see above) in 2020 which accumulated from 2009-2020.
In 2020 you contribute $50,000, leaving $19,500 contribution room unused for 2020. You buy $50,000 worth of stock. The next day, also in 2020, the stock doubles and it's worth $100,000. Also in 2020 you sell the stock and withdraw $100,000, tax-free.

You continue to trade stocks within your TFSA, and hopefully grow your TFSA in 2020, but you make no further contributions or withdrawals in 2020.


The question is, How much room will you have in 2021?
Answer: In the year 2021, the following applies:
(A) Unused contribution room carried forward from last year, 2020: $19,500
(B) Contribution room provided by government for this year, 2021: $6,000
(C) Total withdrawals from last year, 2020: $100,000

Total contribution room for 2021 = $19,500+6,000+100,000 = $125,500.

EXAMPLE 2:
Say between 2020 and 2021 you decided to buy a tax-free car (well you're still stuck with the GST/PST/HST/QST but you get the picture) so you went to the dealer and spent $25,000 of the $100,000 you withdrew in 2020. You now have a car and $75,000 still burning a hole in your pocket. Say in early 2021 you re-contribute the $75,000 you still have left over, to your TFSA. However, in mid-2021 you suddenly need $75,000 because of an emergency so you pull the $75,000 back out. But then a few weeks later, it turns out that for whatever reason you don't need it after all so you decide to put the $75,000 back into the TFSA, also in 2021. You continue to trade inside your TFSA but make no further withdrawals or contributions.

How much room will you have in 2022?
Answer: In the year 2022, the following applies:

(A) Unused contribution room carried forward from last year, 2021: $125,500 - $75,000 - $75,000 = -$24,500.

Already you have a problem. You have over-contributed in 2021. You will be assessed a penalty on the over-contribution! (penalty = 1% a month).

But if you waited until 2022 to re-contribute the $75,000 you pulled out for the emergency.....

In the year 2022, the following would apply:
(A) Unused contribution room carried forward from last year, 2021: $125,500 -$75,000 =$50,500.
(B) Contribution room provided by government for this year, 2022: $6,000
(C) Total withdrawals from last year, 2020: $75,000

Total contribution room for 2022 = $50,500 + $6,000 + $75,000 = $131,500.
...And...re-contributing that $75,000 that was left over from your 2021 emergency that didn't materialize, you still have $131,500-$75,000 = $56,500 of contribution room left in 2022.

For a more comprehensive discussion, please see the CRA info link below.

FAQs That Have Arisen in the Discussion and Other Potential Questions:



  1. Equity and ETF/ETN Options in a TFSA: can I get leverage? Yes. You can buy puts and calls in your TFSA and you only need to have the cash to pay the premium and broker commissions. Example: if XYZ is trading at $70, and you want to buy the $90 call with 6 months to expiration, and the call is trading at $2.50, you only need to have $250 in your account, per option contract, and if you are dealing with BMO IL for example you need $9.95 + $1.25/contract which is what they charge in commission. Of course, any profits on closing your position are tax-free. You only need the full value of the strike in your account if you want to exercise your option instead of selling it. Please note: this is not meant to be an options tutorial; see the Montreal Exchange's Equity Options Reference Manual if you have questions on how options work.
  2. Equity and ETF/ETN Options in a TFSA: what is ok and not ok? Long puts and calls are allowed. Covered calls are allowed, but cash-secured puts are not allowed. All other option trades are also not allowed. Basically the rule is, if the trade is not a covered call and it either requires being short an option or short the stock, you can't do it in a TFSA.
  3. Live in a province where the voting age is 19 so I can't open a TFSA until I'm 19, when does my contribution room begin? Your contribution room begins to accumulate at 18, so if you live in province where the age of majority is 19, you'll get the room carried forward from the year you turned 18.
  4. If I turn 18 on December 31, do I get the contribution room just for that day or for the whole year? The whole year.
  5. Do commissions paid on share transactions count as withdrawals? Unfortunately, no. If you contribute $2,000 cash and you buy $1,975 worth of stock and pay $25 in commission, the $25 does not count as a withdrawal. It is the same as if you lost money in the TFSA.
  6. How much room do I have? If your broker records are complete, you can do a spreadsheet. The other thing you can do is call the CRA and they will tell you.
  7. TFSATFSA direct transfer from one institution to another: this has no impact on your contributions or withdrawals as it counts as neither.
  8. More than 1 TFSA: you can have as many as you want but your total contribution room does not increase or decrease depending on how many accounts you have.
  9. Withdrawals that convert into contribution room in the next year. Do they carry forward indefinitely if not used in the next year? Answer :yes.
  10. Do I have to declare my profits, withdrawals and contributions? No. Your bank or broker interfaces directly with the CRA on this. There are no declarations to make.
  11. Risky investments - smart? In a TFSA you want always to make money, because you pay no tax, and you want never to lose money, because you cannot claim the loss against your income from your job. If in year X you have $5,000 of contribution room and put it into a TFSA and buy Canadian Speculative Corp. and due to the failure of the Canadian Speculative Corp. it goes to zero, two things happen. One, you burn up that contribution room and you have to wait until next year for the government to give you more room. Two, you can't claim the $5,000 loss against your employment income or investment income or capital gains like you could in a non-registered account. So remember Buffett's rule #1: Do not lose money. Rule #2 being don't forget the first rule. TFSA's are absolutely tailor-made for Graham-Buffett value investing or for diversified ETF or mutual fund investing, but you don't want to buy a lot of small specs because you don't get the tax loss.
  12. Moving to/from Canada/residency. You must be a resident of Canada and 18 years old with a valid SIN to open a TFSA. Consult your tax advisor on whether your circumstances make you a resident for tax purposes. Since 2009, your TFSA contribution room accumulates every year, if at any time in the calendar year you are 18 years of age or older and a resident of Canada. Note: If you move to another country, you can STILL trade your TFSA online from your other country and keep making money within the account tax-free. You can withdraw money and Canada will not tax you. But you have to get tax advice in your country as to what they do. There restrictions on contributions for non-residents. See "non residents of Canada:" https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/cra-arc/formspubs/pub/rc4466/rc4466-19e.pdf
  13. The U.S. withholding tax. Dividends paid by U.S.-domiciled companies are subject to a 15% U.S. withholding tax. Your broker does this automatically at the time of the dividend payment. So if your stock pays a $100 USD dividend, you only get $85 USD in your broker account and in your statement the broker will have a note saying 15% U.S. withholding tax. I do not know under what circumstances if any it is possible to get the withheld amount. Normally it is not, but consult a tax professional.
  14. The U.S. withholding tax does not apply to capital gains. So if you buy $5,000 USD worth of Apple and sell it for $7,000 USD, you get the full $2,000 USD gain automatically.
  15. Tax-Free Leverage. Leverage in the TFSA is effectively equal to your tax rate * the capital gains inclusion rate because you're not paying tax. So if you're paying 25% on average in income tax, and the capital gains contribution rate is 50%, the TFSA is like having 12.5%, no margin call leverage costing you 0% and that also doesn't magnify your losses.
  16. Margin accounts. These accounts allow you to borrow money from your broker to buy stocks. TFSAs are not margin accounts. Nothing stopping you from borrowing from other sources (such as borrowing cash against your stocks in an actual margin account, or borrowing cash against your house in a HELOC or borrowing cash against your promise to pay it back as in a personal LOC) to fund a TFSA if that is your decision, bearing in mind the risks, but a TFSA is not a margin account. Consider options if you want leverage that you can use in a TFSA, without borrowing money.
  17. Dividend Tax Credit on Canadian Companies. Remember, dividends paid into the TFSA are not eligible to be claimed for the credit, on the rationale that you already got a tax break.
  18. FX risk. The CRA allows you to contribute and withdraw foreign currency from the TFSA but the contribution/withdrawal accounting is done in CAD. So if you contribute $10,000 USD into your TFSA and withdraw $15,000 USD, and the CAD is trading at 70 cents USD when you contribute and $80 cents USD when you withdraw, the CRA will treat it as if you contributed $14,285.71 CAD and withdrew $18,75.00 CAD.
  19. OTC (over-the-counter stocks). You can only buy stocks if they are listed on an approved exchange ("approved exchange" = TSX, TSX-V, NYSE, NASDAQ and about 25 or so others). The U.S. pink sheets "over-the-counter" market is an example of a place where you can buy stocks, that is not an approved exchange, therefore you can't buy these penny stocks. I have however read that the CRA make an exception for a stock traded over the counter if it has a dual listing on an approved exchange. You should check that with a tax lawyer or accountant though.
  20. The RRSP. This is another great tax shelter. Tax shelters in Canada are either deferrals or in a few cases - such as the TFSA - outright tax breaks, The RRSP is an example of a deferral. The RRSP allows you to deduct your contributions from your income, which the TFSA does not allow. This deduction is a huge advantage if you earn a lot of money. The RRSP has tax consequences for withdrawing money whereas the TFSA does not. Withdrawals from the RRSP are taxable whereas they are obviously not in a TFSA. You probably want to start out with a TFSA and maintain and grow that all your life. It is a good idea to start contributing to an RRSP when you start working because you get the tax deduction, and then you can use the amount of the deduction to contribute to your TFSA. There are certain rules that claw back your annual contribution room into an RRSP if you contribute to a pension. See your tax advisor.
  21. Pensions. If I contribute to a pension does that claw back my TFSA contribution room or otherwise affect my TFSA in any way? Answer: No.
  22. The $10K contribution limit for 2015. This was PM Harper's pledge. In 2015 the Conservative government changed the rules to make the annual government allowance $10,000 per year forever. Note: withdrawals still converted into contribution room in the following year - that did not change. When the Liberals came into power they switched the program back for 2016 to the original Harper rules and have kept the original Harper rules since then. That is why there is the $10,000 anomaly of 2015. The original Harper rules (which, again, are in effect now) called for $500 increments to the annual government allowance as and when required to keep up with inflation, based on the BofC's Consumer Price Index (CPI). Under the new Harper rules, it would have been $10,000 flat forever. Which you prefer depends on your politics but the TFSA program is massively popular with Canadians. Assuming 1.6% annual CPI inflation then the annual contribution room will hit $10,000 in 2052 under the present rules. Note: the Bank of Canada does an excellent and informative job of explaining inflation and the CPI at their website.
  23. Losses in a TFSA - you cannot claim a loss in a TFSA against income. So in a TFSA you always want to make money and never want to lose money. A few ppl here have asked if you are losing money on your position in a TFSA can you transfer it in-kind to a cash account and claim the loss. I would expect no as I cannot see how in view of the fact that TFSA losses can't be claimed, that the adjusted cost base would somehow be the cost paid in the TFSA. But I'm not a tax lawyeaccountant. You should consult a tax professional.
  24. Transfers in-kind to the TFSA and the the superficial loss rule. You can transfer securities (shares etc.) "in-kind," meaning, directly, from an unregistered account to the TFSA. If you do that, the CRA considers that you "disposed" of, meaning, equivalent to having sold, the shares in the unregistered account and then re-purchased them at the same price in the TFSA. The CRA considers that you did this even though the broker transfers the shares directly in the the TFSA. The superficial loss rule, which means that you cannot claim a loss for a security re-purchased within 30 days of sale, applies. So if you buy something for $20 in your unregistered account, and it's trading for $25 when you transfer it in-kind into the TFSA, then you have a deemed disposition with a capital gain of $5. But it doesn't work the other way around due to the superficial loss rule. If you buy it for $20 in the unregistered account, and it's trading at $15 when you transfer it in-kind into the TFSA, the superficial loss rule prevents you from claiming the loss because it is treated as having been sold in the unregistered account and immediately bought back in the TFSA.
  25. Day trading/swing trading. It is possible for the CRA to try to tax your TFSA on the basis of "advantage." The one reported decision I'm aware of (emphasis on I'm aware of) is from B.C. where a woman was doing "swap transactions" in her TFSA which were not explicitly disallowed but the court rules that they were an "advantage" in certain years and liable to taxation. Swaps were subsequently banned. I'm not sure what a swap is exactly but it's not that someone who is simply making contributions according to the above rules would run afoul of. The CRA from what I understand doesn't care how much money you make in the TFSA, they care how you made it. So if you're logged on to your broker 40 hours a week and trading all day every day they might take the position that you found a way to work a job 40 hours a week and not pay any tax on the money you make, which they would argue is an "advantage," although there are arguments against that. This is not legal advice, just information.
  26. The U.S. Roth IRA. This is a U.S. retirement savings tax shelter that is superficially similar to the TFSA but it has a number of limitations, including lack of cumulative contribution room, no ability for withdrawals to convert into contribution room in the following year, complex rules on who is eligible to contribute, limits on how much you can invest based on your income, income cutoffs on whether you can even use the Roth IRA at all, age limits that govern when and to what extent you can use it, and strict restrictions on reasons to withdraw funds prior to retirement (withdrawals prior to retirement can only be used to pay for private medical insurance, unpaid medical bills, adoption/childbirth expenses, certain educational expenses). The TFSA is totally unlike the Roth IRA in that it has none of these restrictions, therefore, the Roth IRA is not in any reasonable sense a valid comparison. The TFSA was modeled after the U.K. Investment Savings Account, which is the only comparable program to the TFSA.
  27. The UK Investment Savings Account. This is what the TFSA was based off of. Main difference is that the UK uses a 20,000 pound annual contribution allowance, use-it-or-lose-it. There are several different flavours of ISA, and some do have a limited recontribution feature but not to the extent of the TFSA.
  28. Is it smart to overcontribute to buy a really hot stock and just pay the 1% a month overcontribution penalty? If the CRA believes you made the overcontribution deliberately the penalty is 100% of the gains on the overcontribution, meaning, you can keep the overcontribution, or the loss, but the CRA takes the profit.
  29. Speculative stocks-- are they ok? There is no such thing as a "speculative stock." That term is not used by the CRA. Either the stock trades on an approved exchange or it doesn't. So if a really blue chip stock, the most stable company in the world, trades on an exchange that is not approved, you can't buy it in a TFSA. If a really speculative gold mining stock in Busang, Indonesia that has gone through the roof due to reports of enormous amounts of gold, but their geologist somehow just mysteriously fell out of a helicopter into the jungle and maybe there's no gold there at all, but it trades on an approved exchange, it is fine to buy it in a TFSA. Of course the risk of whether it turns out to be a good investment or not, is on you.
Remember, you're working for your money anyway, so if you can get free money from the government -- you should take it! Follow the rules because Canadians have ended up with a tax bill for not understanding the TFSA rules.
Appreciate the feedback everyone. Glad this basic post has been useful for many. The CRA does a good job of explaining TFSAs in detail at https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/cra-arc/formspubs/pub/rc4466/rc4466-19e.pdf

Unrelated but of Interest: The Margin Account

Note: if you are interested in how margin accounts work, I refer you to my post on margin accounts, where I use a straightforward explanation of the math behind margin accounts to try and give readers the confidence that they understand this powerful leveraging tool.

How Margin Loans Work - a Primer

submitted by KhingoBhingo to CanadianInvestor [link] [comments]

Baseball Card Flipping Project - Part 16

Hey guys!
It has been FOREVER since my last update and a ton has happened. Sorry for the long post, but hopefully some people appreciate a detailed dive into everything.
A really really really brief recap of the past fifteen parts
I started in December of 2018 with $1,165 with the goal of making $10,000 in one year. In 2019, I had bought and sold over $40k in baseball, football and various sports trading cards. I had a few great successes ($1,165 into $3,085 before fees - $2,771.20 into $6,200.10 before fees - $1,086.68 into $3,190.54 before fees) and a few duds. I generally sell my cards on ebay, but utilize auction houses every now and then. The biggest bottleneck I face is submitting cards to PSA (a third party grading company), a card might have a 2-4 month turnaround time. To successfully "flip" you need to balance some of these purchases with shorter flips. In 2019, I ended with a final profit of $9,262.28 – a tad bit short of my goal. In 2020, my goal is $20,000 (fitting). Using my margins from 2019, I would need to sell around $85k in cards.
You can find the previous installment here
PERSONAL UPDATE
First, I hope everyone is doing well and staying sane. It has been an absolutely wild three months for me, I found out I’m going to be an uncle, I got a cat and I decided I was going to propose to my girlfriend this weekend! I have still been keeping up with this project, the prices for baseball cards have absolutely skyrocketed over the past couple months, so there hasn’t been the same amount of buying as usual. I am going insane with working from home and trying to keep my head above water with everything, but flipping has been (at times) a nice escape. I am fortunate enough to be flipping something that I am passionate about, baseball cards, so I am able to enjoy this and see a lot of neat cards along the way.
In that spirit I have decided to begin keeping some cards for my personal collection as I go along. I read somewhere an interesting method of collecting, reducing your collection to 25 cards. I wanted to give it a shot with a bit of a twist, I want to keep a collection of 25 cards, but still make a profit along the way. So a couple ground rules I set for myself: * The collection is limited to vintage baseball cards (generally 1980’s and older). This was my first collecting passion and I’d like to try to keep to it.
So, without further ado, here are the first four cards in this project. The 1949 Berra came from the Yogi Berra lot I bought from SCP in January. The grades finally came back last week and I did very well on a few cards, so I felt that I deserved to spoil myself a bit. The 1949 Bowman set holds a special spot in my heart for me, my best flip ever was a group of 1949 Bowman cards I purchased for $300 which included a Jackie Robinson rookie that graded PSA 8! I sold it for over $10k. This Yogi Berra card is well centered, nice registration and a great mid-grade example of a baseball icon. I love it. The Ted Williams card and the Willie Mays both came from the December Heritage lot that I had purchased. PSA took FOREVER on this order. I was a little disappointed in the overall grades, but am confident I will turn a profit. The 1956 Topps Ted Williams is such a cool card and a staple in post-war collecting. The Mays I always liked – it’s a little beat up, but the centering is near perfect and the color looks sharp. Finally, I nabbed the 1969 Yaz. This was mostly done because I love the set. 1969 Topps was the last set to feature Mickey Mantle, something that I think goes underappreciated. The set design has always been pretty crisp, it has a couple great rookies and great all-star rookie cards. I’m a fan. Anyways! None of these cards are permanent, I can sell them at any time, but I’d imagine they will be in the collection a while.
Purchased
What Sold
PSA Update
Here is a link to the Google Doc with the status of all of my PSA cards. The spreadsheet also includes a summary of where the project is.
PSA is still extremely backlogged. For this project, I have 276 items with them. Luckily I was able to get quite a few cards back from them recently! As I previously mentioned, I received back the Yogi Berra cards I sent them in January and the Heritage cards I sent in December. Overall I am happy enough with the grades. I think they were fair on the Berra cards and they were rough on the Heritage cards (they were separate orders). I already listed or consigned these cards, so I will have updates next month on these.
Below is an updated summary:
For items purchased in 2019 (denoted with a “*”), the “cost” column represents the ending 2019 inventory valuation. For items purchased in 2020, the cost column is the cost. In the Google Sheet I included an in-depth P&L with full results and 2019 details.
Item Cost* Sold Fees Inventory^ Profit
1936 Goudey Lot (8) 50.00 56.50 (8.48) - (1.98)
Hank Aaron "Odd-Ball" Collection 150.00 777.29 (116.59) - 510.70
(16) Pre-WWII card lot w/ Cobb 1,300.00 1,708.52 (256.28) - 152.24
(23) Sandy Koufax 1950's and 1960's lot 250.00 299.50 (44.93) - 4.57
1977-1979 Topps Baseball Rack & Cello Packs (6) 250.00 380.00 (57.00) - 73.00
1957 Swift Meats Game Complete Set (18) 800.00 680.00 (102.00) (222.00)
(36) 1950s-2000s Multi-Sports Collection 500.00 1,528.51 (229.28) - 799.23
1933-1989 Wax Pack Wrapper Hoard (650+) 400.00 1,918.01 (287.70) - 1,230.31
1941-2004 Multi-Sport Group (33) 800.00 2,859.83 (428.97) 100.00 1,730.86
1912 B18 Blanket Find (100) 1,270.80 1,136.24 (170.44) 500.00 195.00
1962-63 Parkhurst Hockey Lot (45+) 500.00 287.26 (43.09) 400.00 144.17
1953 to 1969 Mickey Mantle Group (16) 1,000.00 2,747.85 (412.18) 150.00 1,485.67
1956-1959 Baseball Star Collection (48) 1,130.00 322.04 (48.31) 900.00 43.73
1961-1969 Baseball Star Collection (61) 804.95 257.78 (38.67) 600.00 14.16
1948-1965 Yogi Berra Collection (26) 1,400.00 399.50 (59.93) 1,050.00 (10.43)
Lot of (4) Signed Perez-Steele Postcards 676.59 - 676.59 -
1950's-1980's Football Wrapper Lot (42) 920.00 1,944.23 (291.63) 732.60
1953 Topps Partial Set (208) 1,472.00 2,855.13 (428.27) 100.00 1,054.86
1953-55 Dormand Postcard Set (47/52) 685.00 804.85 (120.73) 250.00 249.12
1959 & 1960 Venezuela Topps Lot (34) 216.00 58.66 (8.80) 200.00 33.86
1959 Topps Baseball High Grade Set 1,557.30 1,132.80 (169.92) 1,000.00 405.58
1970 Topps Super Proofs Lot (12) 405.41 493.75 (74.06) 200.00 214.28
1887 Allen & Ginter Boxing Lot (14) 403.40 403.40 -
1954 Topps Starter Set (119/250) 662.22 707.50 (106.13) 500.00 439.16
1947 Bond Bread Jackie Robinson Lot (6) 2,220.00 2,125.00 (318.75) 1,480.00 1,066.25
1934 R310 Butterfinger Ruth & Gehrig Lot (2) 720.00 720.00 -
1959 Topps Baseball Near Set (571/572) 3,620.00 3,620.00 -
1973 Topps Complete Set 2,512.40 6,347.41 (952.11) 600.00 3,482.90
1961 Topps PSA Graded Set 5,791.60 11,445.51 (1,716.83) 100.00 4,037.08
2013 Bowman Chrome Judge Black Wave Auto 1,940.00 1,940.00 -
1961-1982 Signed Card Lot (19) 1,364.40 1,120.00 (168.00) 800.00 387.60
35,772.07 44,393.67 (6,659.05) 16,289.99 18,252.54
*-denotes inventory purchased in 2019 valued at 2019 y/e figures. ^ -inventory on hand is valued at a conservative estimate of fair market value for remaining items. `-grading fees are expensed when the card is sent to PSA, fees are not paid until PSA has completed the order. Fees that are expensed, but not paid are sitting in Accounts Payable below.
2020 Grading Fees`: $2,944.79
Current On Hand
Cash: $5,588.15
Inventory See the Google sheet
ALSO! If anyone is interested in what the financials for this project would look like, see below. With 2019 officially in the book, I moved the final 2019 financial statement over for a year-over-year comparison:
As of 8/25/2020 2020 YTD 2019 Final
Cash $5,588.15 $1,680.15
Accounts Receivable $6,743.43 $-
Inventory^ 16,289.99 $10,605.75
Accounts Payable` ($2,886.54) ($1,858.62)
Retained Earnings ($9,262.28) $-
Initial Capital ($1,165.00) ($1,165.00)
Revenue ($44,393.67) ($40,163.15)
Cost of Goods Sold $19,482.08 $22,582.96
Fees (15% of Rev.) $6,659.05 $5,956.97
Grading Fees $2,944.79 $2,360.93
FORECAST
My goal is $20,000 profit for the year. Right now I’m $15,307.75 – PSA has dramatically slowed turnover, but I am definitely on pace to hit my goal, gross margins are up in 2020 compared to 2019 (56.1% vs. 43.8%) and net margins are also up (34.5% vs 23.1%). Sales more than doubled since the last installment and with orders finally coming back from PSA, I should continue to see steady sales.
I look forward to continuing to update everyone on this. Hope you enjoy as much as I do.
Jason
submitted by MachiavellianFuck to Flipping [link] [comments]

Detroit Lions Offseason Review

My first time doing this - thanks for reading!
Lions logo link just so that the thumbnail to this post isn't Logan Stenberg's website
I'll start first with the draft picks.
Entered the draft with 3, 35, 67, 85, 109, 149, 166, 182, 235
Draft Day Trades
Trade Partner Given Away Received
Indianapolis 85, 149, 182 75, 197
Las Vegas 109 121, 172
1st Round
With the 3rd Overall Pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions Select Jeff Okudah, Cornerback, Ohio State University.
Okudah here is the obvious choice. He is not quite a Jalen Ramsey caliber prospect, but close, and hopefully he will fill the gaping hole left by Darius Slay’s regression and departure. Okudah is a technician, he has incredible work ethic, an Energizer Bunny-like drive to get better, and reportedly has a thirst for learning that included him showing up at his defensive coordinator’s house on an off day to watch film. The best way I have seen it put – he is a disciple of his position, completely devoted to becoming better. Not all disciples become masters, but all masters were once disciples. I think Okudah was the obvious choice here, and I’m just glad we didn’t take Derrick Brown this high. Grade: A+
2nd Round
With the 35th Overall Pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select D’Andre Swift, Running Back, University of Georgia.
This came as no surprise to me. I was watching the draft via Pat McAfee’s stream, and when he erroneously reported the Dolphins selected Swift with their final 1st Rounder, I was heartbroken. Swift fills the biggest offensive need for the Lions – a stud running back capable of handling bellcow snap counts. I’m not sold on Kerryon Johnson. I’ve not given up on him either. He has spurts of brilliance, followed by mediocrity, and capped off by injury. He has missed 14 of 32 games. At worst, Kerryon was overdrafted by a wide margin. At best, the lighter workload will allow him to stay healthy and thrive in a run-first offense. Swift can be an immediate contributor on offense, he can help keep Kerryon healthy, and if Kerryon goes down – Swift can handle being RB1 without issue. The only thing I would rather have seen in this situation is AJ Epenesa, but I knew it wasn’t going to happen with the Patriots’ scheme. Grade: A-
3rd Round
With the 67th Overall Pick of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select Julian Okwara, Defensive End, University of Notre Dame.
I’m in love with this pick. Okwara was considered a first round talent after his 2018 season. He fell to the third because of an injury, and if he can get healed up properly then the Lions got an absolute steal here. It is also cool to see because Julian’s brother Romeo is currently a Lion. I was surprised to see the coverage-creates-sacks New Engla- I mean, Detroit front office spend a third on a pass rusher, but I’m choosing to not question a good thing. The risk of “he’s not been the same since the injury” is absolutely worth the possible reward of a dominant DE here. Grade: A+
With the 75th Overall Pick of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select Jonah Jackson, Offensive Guard, Ohio State University.
I like, but don’t love, this pick. I’m not sure Jackson is ready to start, but the Lions moved up to get him. Still, it’s the third round. I think he can develop into a starter, he lacks as a pass protector, and I think he will be the weak link on the O-Line if he is forced into a starting role as a rookie. I would be higher on this pick if we didn’t spend extra draft capital moving up. Grade: B
4th Round
With the 121st Overall Pick of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select Logan Stenberg, Offensive Guard, University of Kentucky.
OHHHH YEAHHHHH! THE KOOLAID MAN’S FILTHY BROTHER, MR. NASTY IS IN TOWN, AND HE’S READY TO RRRRRRRUMMMMBLE.
Stenberg is a Kool-Aid machine, for sure. His nickname is Mr. Nasty and you can even buy his Mr. Nasty merch. Logan if you read this I will gladly accept a sponsorship I myself will be buying a custom Lions jersey with his number and make the name on the back “Mr. Nasty.” He is a monster in the run blocking game, he jumps out and flat out assaults defenders like they owe him money. But, as with any 4th rounder, there is a downside to him – he lacks the agile footwork required of an NFL O-Lineman, which will make him a penalty risk unless he can fix that. He is also unproven as a pass protector, since Kentucky just doesn’t really throw the ball much. This is another high-upside guy who has the tools to develop into a great starter, the biggest drawback I see, and the reason I’m down on this pick, is that the front office essentially drafted what I would consider “project” players back-to-back for the exact same position. If the immediate previous pick wasn’t spent on Jonah Jackson, I’d have given this a much higher grade. Grade: C+
5th Round
With the 166th Overall Pick of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select Quintez Cephus, Wide Receiver, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The Lions have two receivers on their roster that it’s time to start thinking about replacing – Marvin Jones Jr., who still has another 2-3 years of production left in him, and Danny Amendola, who is ancient by receiver standards. Cephus was used as a “big slot” role at Wisconsin. I’m not a big believer in the big slot guy being a wide receiver, if the game’s matchup dictates that a big man will work better in the slot then I much prefer putting a tight end in that role. That said, Okudah and many other Big 10 DBs said Cephus is the most difficult receiver to cover. His combine and pro day numbers don’t really match up, so I don’t know what to think there. My personal hope is that Cephus can develop into a receiver similar to Jones, though the consensus around Lions fans is that he will continue his slot role to become similar to Anquan Boldin. My fear is that his combine speed will be accurate, and the skills that made him difficult to cover in college won’t translate to the NFL. I can’t confidently judge this pick, but I will say he has all the downside and not nearly as much upside as the last three picks. Depending on his usage and development, his floor is Geronimo Allison and his ceiling is AJ Green. Grade: B
With the 172nd Overall Pick of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select Jason Huntley, Running Back, New Mexico State University.
I’ve written about how I think Jason Huntley should be the chosen one to develop into a Slot WR. I believe his floor is JD McKissic and his ceiling is Randall Cobb. His build is much more that of a receiver, I honestly don’t think his body will be durable enough to handle full-time RB play in the NFL. If he is developed as a receiver, I am a huge fan of this pick. However, drafting Huntley cost the Lions a shot at Braden Mann. If Huntley is only used to replace Jamal Agnew as a returner and only contributes to the offense from deep on the depth chart, I would so much rather have drafted a generational talent at Punter. Grade: B
I will now take a moment to say I would have gladly given up the 6th and 7th rounders to trade up for Mann. Or skipped the trade-up for Jackson to keep #182. I’m not high enough on either of these next two guys to lose out on Mann.
6th Round
With the 197th Overall Pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select John Penisini, Defensive Tackle, University of Utah.
The Lions were looking to improve their run defense, especially after losing Snacks Harrison. Penisini won’t do much for that, but he will be a half-decent backup nose tackle. He’s a 6th rounder for a reason – he is a backup at best, and has almost no pass rushing ability versus NFL caliber offensive lines. I’m okay with this pick this late in the draft, but I honestly believe he should’ve been a UDFA. Grade: D
7th Round
With the 235th Overall Pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, the Detroit Lions select Jashon Cornell, Defensive Tackle, Ohio State University.
After being disappointed by the 6th round, I am pleased with this 7th round pick. Jashon Cornell was graded by PFF as just slightly behind Derrick Brown. I’m not entirely sure why he fell to the 7th, but I assume it’s because he is 23 years old and leaves Ohio State as a 5th year senior. Cornell can be a rotational guy right away, and might be able to blossom into a starter on the D line. If not, it’s a 7th round pick. Grade: A+
Even though we got a lot of value in #235, still would’ve traded both Penisini and Cornell for Mann.
Remainder of post continued in comments. Links below
Coaching Changes and game-by-game schedule prediction
Free Agency and pre-draft day trades
Training Camp Battles
Excel Spreadsheet Download of my personal "armchair GM" 53 man roster (NOTE: This is not the roster I think the Lions will actually go with. Just a fun little experiment of how I'd build the team, especially given the new practice squad rules)
submitted by atlantis737 to nfl [link] [comments]

CapitalMind Chase : Trend based market timing strategy on Nifty futures involving leverage.

I stumbled upon this article on CapitalMind blog which lead to this whole research of trying to reverse engineering the strategy :
Blog : https://www.capitalmind.in/2020/07/introducing-capitalmind-chase-a-systematic-index-trend-following-strategy/
So.. Capitalmind has apparently come up with this strategy on NIFTY futures trading which essentially tries to time the market based on certain set of rules to avoid drawdowns. They've made only the results public, so the methodology is behind paywall and hence not something I can access, but here's some of the basics that I understood out of it :
This way, they can essentially get 2x returns out of the bullish cycles and get 1x (or none) of the drawdown from the bearish cycles or dips.
What I believe they're doing :
They backtested this strategy from 2008 onwards (to factor for GFC) and claim that Capitalmind Chase has delivered an annualized return of 37.41 %, while a buy and hold on NIFTY delivered close to 8.20% since 2008.
Here's an introduction article which has infographics for the same : https://www.capitalmind.in/2020/07/introducing-capitalmind-chase-a-systematic-index-trend-following-strategy/
Another article that goes into more detail : https://www.capitalmind.in/2020/08/capitalmind-chase-roaring-day-and-night/
They also made a podcast for this, but I followed only half before I dozed off : https://www.capitalmind.in/2020/08/podcast-31-how-trend-following-can-make-buy-and-hold-bette
It does look interesting, but the only tricky part is they aren't making the details public (which is understandable since it's premium) which leads to uncertainty. Also apparently they're going to give calls on when to buy/sell to their premium members which I'm not sure how I feel about.
But since we have the excel data, it's possible to make some sense out of it and figure out what indicators they're using. It's interesting strategy either way.
I'm not very sure on where to go with this, so I'm making an initial version of this post and will update it as I do more research on it, but it does look something promising.
Note : This post does not promote leaking their methodology in any way. The aim of this post is merely to try and reverse engineer it instead. Since the primary part of this, i.e indicators and weightages are the most important factor, we are merely trying to figure out what's the correct way to try and mimic something similar.
submitted by IrtahkEnt to IndianStreetBets [link] [comments]

[OC] 5 breakout seasons you might have missed this year:

This season, most of you have probably heard or read at one point or another about Luka Dončić soaring into the MVP conversation as a sophomore, the many all-star jumps (Ingram/Trae/Sabonis/Mitchell/Siakam/Booker), Bam Adebayo making a name for himself as an all-round stud in Miami, the Hornets' Devonte' Graham's heartwarming vault into NBA relevance, Ben Simmons's All-Defensive leap, and Jayson Tatum's long-awaited superstar transformation mid-season.
This post, then, will be talking about some breakouts around the league that you might have missed this season, coming from players on less talked-about teams, or simply improved aspects of certain players' games that may have flown under the radar for whatever reason.

1: Jonathan Isaac, defensive savant

[Note: Please read this fantastic and highly detailed two-part post by Jonathan Chen, from which I pilfered the vast majority of the clips that I've linked below: Jonathan Isaac: A Unicorn on the Defensive End]
Jonathan Isaac broke out as an early Defensive Player of the Year-candidate for the Orlando Magic this season - only an unfortunate season-ending left knee injury 32 games in stopped him from achieving a well-deserved All-Defensive spot this year.
While Isaac's gaudy per-game averages (7 rebounds, 1.6 steals, 2.4 blocks) are useful shorthand, they actually underplay his overall impact because of how truly unicorn-ish and all-encompassing his defensive profile is.
  • Paint defense
It all starts with Judah's elite rim protection - opponents shoot a sizeable 10.2 FG% worse within 6 feet of the rim (50.9 DFG%) when Isaac is the closest defender, where his savant-like shot-blocking instincts kick in as the Magic's defensive anchor. Whether he's the primary defender or the weak-side help, he's got fantastic footwork and is very quick off his feet, possessing a mean second-jump. Combined with his 6-11 frame, 7-1 wingspan, and an excellent sense of timing, Isaac is an athletic, long, and relentless roadblock at the rim to thwart otherwise high-percentage opponent shot-attempts in the paint. He's able to tussle with larger behemoths as well - here he is denying Embiid at the rim with one hand. In addition, Isaac remains quite disciplined, managing to consistently remain vertical on his contests and averaging only 2.5 fouls/game, impressive for a 3rd-year defender just 22 years of age.
  • Man defense
Isaac's man defense is already highly impressive, able to guard bigs and guards alike without giving an inch (he has a 62.2% versatility index) and able to guard either the primary or secondary offensive options effectively while also protecting the rim. He's got quick hands that he uses to force turnovers, constantly stripping players when they gather or pick up their dribble. In the post, his length and lanky frame makes him a pest. When defending perimeter threats, his footwork is impeccable, he maneuvers screens really well, and he's agile and long enough to shut down the Greek Freak in semi-transition. When he is beat, he often chases perpetrators down from behind.
  • Team defense
Isaac's off-ball activity and team defense, meanwhile, is reminiscent of peak Draymond, KG, or Andrei Kirilenko, constantly making timely rotations to eat up passing lanes, anticipating and disrupting opponent plays, crowding ball-handlers and halting dribble-penetration, closing out to shooters, and swatting shot attempts at the rim, basically making himself an all-around menace on the court.
  • Some of his few defensive weaknesses:
He can gamble at times for steals (which does work out more often than not thanks to his length and instincts) and occasionally foul on shot contests, he can get caught out-of-position in the post sometimes, and he can be a bit overly twitchy in the paint, falling for pump-fakes from time to time.
  • Orlando's best and most important defender:
He leads the team and ranks near the top of the league in steals/game (1.6), blocks/game (2.4), defensive loose-balls recovered (0.8), and deflections/game (3.3); is 2nd on the team in charges drawn (0.13), defensive box-outs (2.0); and is 3rd in defensive rebounds/game (5.2).
With Isaac on the court, the Orlando Magic's defensive rating jumps by a whopping 4.5 points to an excellent 106.5 DRTG (-3.9 rDRTG), which would rank as the 4th-best defense in the league over a full season, significantly higher than the 9th place (109.0 DRTG) the Magic ended up at at the time of the NBA's suspension.
  • Advanced metrics:
Box- and non-box advanced metrics all think very highly of Isaac's overall defensive impact - he has a +4.8 D-RAPTOR (3rd in NBA), +3.2 D-PIPM (4th), and a +2.9 D-BPM (3rd).
  • So what's next for Isaac?
Isaac is slowly starting to get the benefit of the doubt from referees:
"I thought they were going to call it, I thought they were going to call it goaltending,’’ said a relieved Isaac after his Magic notched their fourth straight victory – this one a gritty 93-87 defeat of Cleveland. "I just tried to get (Thompson’s hook shot) at its highest point, and they gave it to me. I think the refs are starting to let me slide a little bit and I like it.’’
It probably won't be very long before Isaac will be able to run rampant as a full-blown terror on the defensive end, and combined with his decent ancillary offensive numbers as a tertiary scorer / potential floor-spacer (12.0 PPG, 2.8 3PA, 33 3P%), Jonathan is already a truly indispensable part of the Magic rotation for the foreseeable future.
(Bonus clip that perhaps summarises the entirety of Isaac's versatile skillset: His near-5x5 performance in a 1-point loss vs the Dallas Mavericks' historic league-leading offense on November 6, putting up 13/10/5/6/4 while tormenting Porzingis all night long (10 pts, 2 TOVs, 29 FG%) and holding Luka and KP to a combined 37 points on 35 shots (47.5 TS%) and 8 turnovers.)

2: Christian Wood, the NBA's newest unicorn

After 49 games of being an overqualified backup to Andre Drummond (averaging 10/5/1/1/1 on excellent efficiency), Detroit finally moved Christian Wood into the starting lineup after Drummond got traded to Cleveland for their final 13 games before the NBA suspended its season.
  • "Sooo.. who is Wood, and why should we care?"
In his final 13 games, Christian Wood has played like a bonafide star, averaging 22.8 points, 10.2 rebounds, and 2.0 assists, 0.8 blocks, 0.8 steals, and 1.7 threes on 66% True Shooting (56 FG%, 40 3P% on 4.2 3PA, 76 FT%).
He's been remarkably consistent as well, scoring fewer than 17 points only once during this stretch, and showing up against a variety of good teams - 3 of his final 4 games were against stout opposition, and he rose to the challenge admirably, with outputs of 29/9/3 on 91 TS% vs OKC, 30/11/2 on 56 TS% vs the Jazz and reigning DPOY Gobert, and a career-high 32/7/2/3/2 on 81 TS% v.s. Philly.
  • "He's on a bad team though, and Detroit lost all but one of those 13 games. Aren't these just empty numbers?"
There's exists some evidence that these aren't empty calorie numbers.
For one thing, Wood is an advanced stats darling - he ranks in the top-20 to 30 range in most box- and non-box metrics: +4.5 RAPTOR (18th), +3.1 BPM (BBRef) (27th), 0.184 WS/48 (24th), +2.98 PIPM (26th), +2.82 RPM (ESPN) (22nd), +2.09 RAPM (20th).
For another, the Pistons are a whopping +10.9 points better with Wood on the court, with their defensive rating improving by +3 and their offensive rating getting a ridiculous +8 boost.
  • "So, what makes him so effective?"
Offensively, Wood is particularly special, able to shine as either a PF or a C.
When he plays the 5, he is an elite roll-man in the PnR (97th percentile); his potent roll-gravity often distracts defending bigs to get teammates easier looks at the rim. His athleticism and feathery touch allow him to finish at an elite rate at the rim (77 FG% in restricted area), either skying for lobs or shedding defenders with power and speed.
Wood is very aggressive in the short roll too, bullying defenders with unflashy but effective bumps, pivots, fakes, and his leaping ability, not shying away from contact either, affording him a healthy free-throw rate overall (6 FTA/game as starter, 76 FT%).
Wood is also a highly capable offensive rebounder (3.2 ORB/game in final 13 games, top 20 in ORB%), adept at following up on both teammate misses and his own.
Of course, Wood is also a remarkable shooter for his position (40 3P% on 4.2 3pa/game in final 13 games), with a quick and high release off-the-catch that's unbothered by all but the longest of perimeter defenders, opening up driving lanes for teammates with his gravity. "Wood is the rare stretch-4 who doubles as a rim-running 5", allowing coaches a high level of versatility when designing offensive sets. Wood possesses a smooth dribble, too, which lets him attack closeouts and slash to the basket.
  • "What about on defense, though?"
Defensively speaking, Wood has tremendous physical tools: 7-3 wingspan, excellent feet, highly athletic, making him a highly versatile defender capable of guarding speedy guards on switches (68.9 versatility index). He's a decent rim-protector - opponents shoot 6% worse within 6 feet of the hoop when Wood is the closest defender, and Detroit as a whole are +4.4 points better defensively when Wood is on the court. His pick-and-roll defense is actually quite decent, knowing when to drop and timing his contests well. Overall, he's likely a slight positive on defense.
  • "Does he suck at anything?"
Wood can't power through larger defenders, and his post game is highly limited. To quote Jonathan Tjarks, "his ability to score one-on-one is still mostly theoretical—he’s in the 22nd percentile of post scorers this season and the 10th percentile in isolations."
Wood is also a subpar playmaker - he had a 2.0/2.3 assist-to-turnover ratio in his final 13 games. He can make basic reads out of double-teams, but has yet to truly weaponise his own scoring threat to get teammates easier looks on a more consistent basis.
Defensively, his awareness as a team defender has room for improvement, and his motor can be sloppy (seen in some mediocre box-outs or close-outs). He also has trouble against heftier post players, and some speedy guards can blow by him.
Finally, Small Sample Size alert! Some regression is very likely expected for Wood's gaudy shooting numbers once more teams learn more about his abilities and begin to throw more defenders (and better defenders) on him.
  • "So what's the future like for Christian?"
Wood is trusting his teammates more on both sides of the ball. He’s not forcing things on offense... Wood is scoring by giving the ball up and trusting it will come back to him when he’s open instead of constantly hunting for his own shot.
Wood doesn't demand touches and is highly efficient in his role, something that will let him scale well on good offenses, something that bodes well for his future as a Piston but also makes him an attractive addition for a playoff side - he's an unrestricted free-agent this summer. If he carries or builds upon this level of production into next season, he'll easily be a Most Improved Player contender with All-Star potential.
  • "Hmm, I'm actually kinda interested in knowing more about him!"
In that case, here are two marvellous breakdowns of Wood's game which I consumed and referenced voraciously while writing this section:
-Coach Daniel on YouTube: Why Christian Wood Is Genuinely A Terrific Player
-Jonathan Tjarks, The Ringer: Get Used to Hearing Christian Wood’s Name

3: Jaren Jackson Jr, one of the best volume-shooters in the league

Jaren Jackson Jr (17/5/1.5 on +2.6 rTS%), is a proper unicorn, and easily the 2nd most important offensive piece on the Grizzlies, mainly due to his elite floor-spacing opening things up considerably for their offense - he's frighteningly adept at his role, hitting 40% of his 6 to 7 three-point attempts per game.
  • "Surely the section title is clickbait or hyperbole, though, right? He's just a big, after all, he can't be that good"
Actually, there are only 11 other players in the entire league (≥30 GP) who have shot at least as accurately as Jaren (39.7 3P%) on at least as many attempts (6.3 3PA).
Here are all 135 3-pointers he's made this season, just to get an idea of how he shoots these, and here's him draining 9 threes on the league-leading Bucks' defense en route to a career-high 43 points.
  • "So does he just stand in the corner and wait for Ja to feed him?"
Not exactly... JJJ has a somewhat atypical form but a quick and high release, and he shoots a truly incredible variety of threes, making them as part of pick-and-pop action, some simply off-the-dribble, some stepbacks, some in transition, some on the move, some off screens, or and he even sprinkles in the odd logo yeet from 30 feet out.
To quote some more from this excellent SB Nation breakdown of Jaren Jackson Jr's versatile game by Mike Prada:
The fact that Jackson can take and make so many different kinds of threes enables the Grizzlies to deploy him in so many different spots on the court. He has no obvious sweet spot, which means there’s rarely a worry he’ll catch the ball somewhere he doesn’t belong. He can toggle between playmaker, primary scorer, screener, and floor spacer, depending on what the Grizzlies need at that particular moment.
Better yet, he can do all four within the same play, which ensures Memphis’ sets always have secondary options. A pick-and-pop that the defense covers effectively can quickly swing into a dribble handoff, post-up, or second-side screening action, and it’s difficult for the defense to peg exactly where Jackson fits in to those sequences. In an instant, he’s flipped from the big man screener that gets a guard open into the primary option on a flare screen to get him a three.
[vid]
And if that shot isn’t there, he can quickly flow back into being a screener for a guard curling up from the corner.
[vid]
Or — and this is spicy — he can invert the traditional big/guard setup and act as the ball-handler immediately.
[vid]
Well, overplaying JJJ's shooting is unwise - he possesses a decent handle for a big (relatively few turnovers considering he drives quite often) and is excellent at attacking closeouts and finishing at in the paint (65 FG% in restricted area). Some of his long strides and wrong-footed finishes bring to mind Pascal Siakam. His post scoring is well below-average (26th percentile), his ISO scoring is decent (65th percentile), and his shooting in the non-restricted area of the paint (floaters and such) isn't anything to write home about (39.5 FG%). Interestingly, he rarely takes midrange shots, with a James Harden-esque 16 midrange attempts over the entire season.
Defensively-speaking, Jaren is very versatile and has incredible length, athleticism, footwork, and timing, able to switch onto bigs and guards alike with equal ease and possessing preternatural defensive instincts as a help defender. However, he is still some way from fulfilling his All-Defensive, even DPOY potential, as he's haunted by persistent fouling issues - he's averaged 5.2 fouls/36 in each of his first 2 seasons. His rebounding rate is anemic for a player his size, too (3.7 D-Rebs/game) - part of this might be due to him playing out on the perimeter a lot, part of it might just be due to his rebounding being naturally poor. (In case you were wondering, JJJ's lack of rebounding isn't a Steven Adams issue because he's just boxing people out all the time, either - he's 109th in the league in defensive-box-outs/game.) His current overall defensive impact, therefore, is quite neutral at the moment - most advanced numbers don't think highly of it. Memphis have the 16th ranked defense in the league, and their defensive rating actually improves with JJJ off the court (some of this might just be noise, or perhaps a case of Grizzlies' backups shining against weaker bench units). In any case, these current defensive shortcomings are something Grizzlies fans will likely gladly live with, considering JJJ's offensive value and the promise of future improvements in his defensive impact once he learns to foul less.

4: Kris Dunn, the modern-era Tony Allen?

This season, the Bulls' dogged guard slash forward Kris Dunn has graded out consistently as one of the very best and most impactful defenders in the NBA, regardless of position. For the first time in his career, Dunn's team is A) excellent at defense with him on the court, and B) much better on defense with him on the court than without.
First, though, let's get the numbers out of the way:
  • Height: 6-3, Weight: 205 lb, Wingspan: 6-10, 51 GP, 24.9 MPG
  • 2nd in Steals/game (2.0), 1st in Steal % by a wide margin, 4th in Deflections/game (only player in the top 11 averaging fewer than 25 minutes a night), 8th in Defensive loose-balls recovered/game
  • 2nd in Defensive Box Plus Minus (BBRef)
  • 5th in Defensive PIPM
  • 7th Defensive RAPTOR, which incorporates player tracking data
  • 7th in Defensive RAPM / Luck-adjusted RAPM
  • 13th in Defensive Real Plus-Minus (ESPN)
  • Bulls have a 106.4 Defensive Rating (-4.0 rDRTG) with Kris Dunn on the floor, which would rank 4th in the NBA over a full season. The Bulls defense also improves by a massive +6.2 points when Dunn enters the game.
  • 67.8 Versatility Index, guarding positions 1-3 at least 19% of the time each, and spending 15% of his possessions guarding PFs and Cs
  • Held pick-and-roll ball-handlers to 0.71 points per possession, one of the best marks in the league
  • Can guard either the primary or secondary offensive options highly effectively as required
  • Opponents shoot 1.5% worse on 3s when Dunn is the closest defender
  • "Among those who logged at least 20 minutes per game, Dunn led all players in the percentage of his points that came off a turnover, at a whopping 29.3 percent. It’s reminiscent of prime Tony Allen — who used to live near the top of the league in this category — and more than doubled his production from the previous year."
Adding on some more quotes from Michael Pina's fantastic SB Nation breakdown of Dunn's defense, "Kris Dunn is a dying breed in today’s NBA. That’s why he’s so fascinating":
On the night Kris Dunn suffered a knee injury that will likely end his season, I sat by his locker to chat about defense. Considering no guard in the NBA has been better at it this season, the topic made sense.
We talked about... The dark arts that go into learning his opponent’s specific tendencies:
“A lot of guys who are righties like to go left to be able to get to their jump shot, and a lot of people who are righties like to go downhill to their right side. But if you’re a righty, most likely you like to go left. I just feel like you just have, you know, more in your bag of tricks going left. If you’re a lefty, most of the time they like going right. It’s just how they do it.
I like to break down to see what’s their go-to move. Some people when they come down the court, if they have the ball in their left hand, they’re getting ready to shoot. If they have the ball in their right hand, they’re ready to drive.”
... And player comparisons:
“I feel like Tony Allen, he just fits what I do. He’ll pounce on you. He was strong, physical. I think he could guard 1 through 3, even fours. I feel like I can guard some fours sometimes. I feel like that’s a good comparison because he’s got that dog, he’s got that bloodhound in him.”
Dunn’s season-long defensive impact was, to be frank, spectacular. He thrived in Jim Boylen’s tight-rope-walk of a defensive scheme, torpedoing passing lanes, living in his man’s jersey, and never giving up on a possession.
For most defenders, including Dunn, a majority of his defensive possessions are spent off the ball, and it’s here where his knowledge, instincts, and timing swirl up into a typhoon that the offense then has to navigate.
“He’s an all-defensive defender if I’ve ever seen one, and I’ve seen a few of them,” Boylen said right before the injury. “Paul George, Kawhi Leonard. He’s an All-Defensive guy.”
  • Indeed, Kris Dunn should receive some serious consideration for an All-Defensive spot. He may not get it because the Bulls are bad and his offensive role is limited, hence he likely won't be well-known to most voters, but he's clearly been one of the best guard defenders in the league this year, and one of the most impactful defenders in the league, period.

5: Kawhi Leonard, playmaker

This entry might surprise some readers, but yes, in the 2019-20 season, reigning Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard has finally broken out as a PASSER - 5.0 APG, decent 1.9:1 AST/TO ratio, 27.0 AST%, impressive 6.7 Passer Rating (Backpicks).
See, prior to this season, Kawhi was not actually a very good passer or playmaker.
  • A fun and relevant stat- Kawhi only has 10 TOTAL career games (regular season and playoffs combined) with 8 or more assists, and a whopping 7 of them came in the 2019-20 regular season. (source)
In previous years, Kawhi has had a few high-assist games in the playoffs, mostly as a result of making basic passes out of double-teams when teams commit multiple defenders to slow down his monster playoff-scoring, but he's never been a proficient playmaking wing like LeBron/Kobe/MJ, often lacking accuracy and velocity on many of his passes, and very rarely making more advanced reads (throwing skip passes out of a Pick-and-Roll/PnR, for example). After developing into the amazing ISO scorer we now know him as in 2017, Kawhi was generally in score-first mode for the vast majority of his possessions, generally only trying to find teammates when his own attack had fizzled out. This slightly limited his team's and his own ceiling as an offensive force, unable to punish help consistently and effectively.
This season, though, Kawhi burst out of the gate as a shockingly comfortable and effective passer and playmaker, averaging 8 APG in his first 4 games. Far from his probing, soft, and hesitant passes late in the shot clock to teammates in previous years, this version of the Klaw tries to keep his head up and his offensive options open, always tracking where his teammates are. He consistently hits the Clippers' bigs Zubac and Harrell in the PnR with crisp high-speed bounce-passes, throws no-looks and skip passes to shooters, and even manipulates defenders by freezing them with his eyes before rapidly lasering the ball to open teammates under the rim.
To quote Zach Lowe:
He already has developed chemistry with two very different dance partners in Ivica Zubac and Montrezl Harrell. Zubac is more laborious, and so Leonard navigates with zigzaggy, start-and-stop patience until Zubac rumbles free: clip
Harrell can zip to the rim or mirror Leonard's pitter-pat. Harrell also is a master at re-screening at different angles, and Leonard is learning to bob and weave behind him -- and use the threat of a handoff to slice backdoor: clip
His passing leap shows up on film, too, where he rarely looks lost anymore, knowing where his teammates are at all times, but it also shows up in the numbers: easily a career-high 5.0 assists/game (previous high was 3.3 in 2017), 27.0 AST% (previous high 18.9% in 2017).
The rest of the league should be worried - one of the finest scorers in the game has finally upgraded his passing game to match.
That's it for today, thanks for reading!
submitted by KagsTheOneAndOnly to nba [link] [comments]

Selling Project - Part 16

Hey guys!
It has been FOREVER since my last update and a ton has happened. Sorry for the long post, but hopefully some people appreciate a detailed dive into everything.
A really really really brief recap of the past fifteen parts
I started in December of 2018 with $1,165 with the goal of making $10,000 in one year. In 2019, I had bought and sold over $40k in baseball, football and various sports trading cards. I had a few great successes ($1,165 into $3,085 before fees - $2,771.20 into $6,200.10 before fees - $1,086.68 into $3,190.54 before fees) and a few duds. I generally sell my cards on ebay, but utilize auction houses every now and then. The biggest bottleneck I face is submitting cards to PSA (a third party grading company), a card might have a 2-4 month turnaround time. To successfully "flip" you need to balance some of these purchases with shorter flips. In 2019, I ended with a final profit of $9,262.28 – a tad bit short of my goal. In 2020, my goal is $20,000 (fitting). Using my margins from 2019, I would need to sell around $85k in cards.
I also keep a few cards for my personal collection (more on that below). Here are the cards I have kept so far.
You can find the previous installment here
PERSONAL UPDATE
First, I hope everyone is doing well and staying sane. It has been an absolutely wild three months for me, I found out I’m going to be an uncle, I got a cat and I decided I was going to propose to my girlfriend this weekend! I have still been keeping up with this project, the prices for baseball cards have absolutely skyrocketed over the past couple months, so there hasn’t been the same amount of buying as usual. I am going insane with working from home and trying to keep my head above water with everything, but flipping has been (at times) a nice escape. I am fortunate enough to be flipping something that I am passionate about, baseball cards, so I am able to enjoy this and see a lot of neat cards along the way.
In that spirit I have decided to begin keeping some cards for my personal collection as I go along. I read somewhere an interesting method of collecting, reducing your collection to 25 cards. I wanted to give it a shot with a bit of a twist, I want to keep a collection of 25 cards, but still make a profit along the way. So a couple ground rules I set for myself: * The collection is limited to vintage baseball cards (generally 1980’s and older). This was my first collecting passion and I’d like to try to keep to it.
So, without further ado, here are the first four cards in this project. The 1949 Berra came from the Yogi Berra lot I bought from SCP in January. The grades finally came back last week and I did very well on a few cards, so I felt that I deserved to spoil myself a bit. The 1949 Bowman set holds a special spot in my heart for me, my best flip ever was a group of 1949 Bowman cards I purchased for $300 which included a Jackie Robinson rookie that graded PSA 8! I sold it for over $10k. This Yogi Berra card is well centered, nice registration and a great mid-grade example of a baseball icon. I love it. The Ted Williams card and the Willie Mays both came from the December Heritage lot that I had purchased. PSA took FOREVER on this order. I was a little disappointed in the overall grades, but am confident I will turn a profit. The 1956 Topps Ted Williams is such a cool card and a staple in post-war collecting. The Mays I always liked – it’s a little beat up, but the centering is near perfect and the color looks sharp. Finally, I nabbed the 1969 Yaz. This was mostly done because I love the set. 1969 Topps was the last set to feature Mickey Mantle, something that I think goes underappreciated. The set design has always been pretty crisp, it has a couple great rookies and great all-star rookie cards. I’m a fan. Anyways! None of these cards are permanent, I can sell them at any time, but I’d imagine they will be in the collection a while.
Purchased
What Sold
PSA Update
Here is a link to the Google Doc with the status of all of my PSA cards. The spreadsheet also includes a summary of where the project is.
PSA is still extremely backlogged. For this project, I have 276 items with them. Luckily I was able to get quite a few cards back from them recently! As I previously mentioned, I received back the Yogi Berra cards I sent them in January and the Heritage cards I sent in December. Overall I am happy enough with the grades. I think they were fair on the Berra cards and they were rough on the Heritage cards (they were separate orders). I already listed or consigned these cards, so I will have updates next month on these.
Below is an updated summary:
For items purchased in 2019 (denoted with a “*”), the “cost” column represents the ending 2019 inventory valuation. For items purchased in 2020, the cost column is the cost. In the Google Sheet I included an in-depth P&L with full results and 2019 details.
Item Cost* Sold Fees Inventory^ Profit
1936 Goudey Lot (8) 50.00 56.50 (8.48) - (1.98)
Hank Aaron "Odd-Ball" Collection 150.00 777.29 (116.59) - 510.70
(16) Pre-WWII card lot w/ Cobb 1,300.00 1,708.52 (256.28) - 152.24
(23) Sandy Koufax 1950's and 1960's lot 250.00 299.50 (44.93) - 4.57
1977-1979 Topps Baseball Rack & Cello Packs (6) 250.00 380.00 (57.00) - 73.00
1957 Swift Meats Game Complete Set (18) 800.00 680.00 (102.00) (222.00)
(36) 1950s-2000s Multi-Sports Collection 500.00 1,528.51 (229.28) - 799.23
1933-1989 Wax Pack Wrapper Hoard (650+) 400.00 1,918.01 (287.70) - 1,230.31
1941-2004 Multi-Sport Group (33) 800.00 2,859.83 (428.97) 100.00 1,730.86
1912 B18 Blanket Find (100) 1,270.80 1,136.24 (170.44) 500.00 195.00
1962-63 Parkhurst Hockey Lot (45+) 500.00 287.26 (43.09) 400.00 144.17
1953 to 1969 Mickey Mantle Group (16) 1,000.00 2,747.85 (412.18) 150.00 1,485.67
1956-1959 Baseball Star Collection (48) 1,130.00 322.04 (48.31) 900.00 43.73
1961-1969 Baseball Star Collection (61) 804.95 257.78 (38.67) 600.00 14.16
1948-1965 Yogi Berra Collection (26) 1,400.00 399.50 (59.93) 1,050.00 (10.43)
Lot of (4) Signed Perez-Steele Postcards 676.59 - 676.59 -
1950's-1980's Football Wrapper Lot (42) 920.00 1,944.23 (291.63) 732.60
1953 Topps Partial Set (208) 1,472.00 2,855.13 (428.27) 100.00 1,054.86
1953-55 Dormand Postcard Set (47/52) 685.00 804.85 (120.73) 250.00 249.12
1959 & 1960 Venezuela Topps Lot (34) 216.00 58.66 (8.80) 200.00 33.86
1959 Topps Baseball High Grade Set 1,557.30 1,132.80 (169.92) 1,000.00 405.58
1970 Topps Super Proofs Lot (12) 405.41 493.75 (74.06) 200.00 214.28
1887 Allen & Ginter Boxing Lot (14) 403.40 403.40 -
1954 Topps Starter Set (119/250) 662.22 707.50 (106.13) 500.00 439.16
1947 Bond Bread Jackie Robinson Lot (6) 2,220.00 2,125.00 (318.75) 1,480.00 1,066.25
1934 R310 Butterfinger Ruth & Gehrig Lot (2) 720.00 720.00 -
1959 Topps Baseball Near Set (571/572) 3,620.00 3,620.00 -
1973 Topps Complete Set 2,512.40 6,347.41 (952.11) 600.00 3,482.90
1961 Topps PSA Graded Set 5,791.60 11,445.51 (1,716.83) 100.00 4,037.08
2013 Bowman Chrome Judge Black Wave Auto 1,940.00 1,940.00 -
1961-1982 Signed Card Lot (19) 1,364.40 1,120.00 (168.00) 800.00 387.60
35,772.07 44,393.67 (6,659.05) 16,289.99 18,252.54
*-denotes inventory purchased in 2019 valued at 2019 y/e figures. ^ -inventory on hand is valued at a conservative estimate of fair market value for remaining items. `-grading fees are expensed when the card is sent to PSA, fees are not paid until PSA has completed the order. Fees that are expensed, but not paid are sitting in Accounts Payable below.
2020 Grading Fees`: $2,944.79
Current On Hand
Cash: $5,588.15
Inventory See the Google sheet
ALSO! If anyone is interested in what the financials for this project would look like, see below. With 2019 officially in the book, I moved the final 2019 financial statement over for a year-over-year comparison:
As of 8/25/2020 2020 YTD 2019 Final
Cash $5,588.15 $1,680.15
Accounts Receivable $6,743.43 $-
Inventory^ 16,289.99 $10,605.75
Accounts Payable` ($2,886.54) ($1,858.62)
Retained Earnings ($9,262.28) $-
Initial Capital ($1,165.00) ($1,165.00)
Revenue ($44,393.67) ($40,163.15)
Cost of Goods Sold $19,482.08 $22,582.96
Fees (15% of Rev.) $6,659.05 $5,956.97
Grading Fees $2,944.79 $2,360.93
FORECAST
My goal is $20,000 profit for the year. Right now I’m $15,307.75 – PSA has dramatically slowed turnover, but I am definitely on pace to hit my goal, gross margins are up in 2020 compared to 2019 (56.1% vs. 43.8%) and net margins are also up (34.5% vs 23.1%). Sales more than doubled since the last installment and with orders finally coming back from PSA, I should continue to see steady sales.
I look forward to continuing to update everyone on this. Hope you enjoy as much as I do.
Jason
submitted by MachiavellianFuck to baseballcards [link] [comments]

Baseball Card Flipping Project - Part 16

Hey guys!
It has been FOREVER since my last update and a ton has happened. Sorry for the long post, but hopefully some people appreciate a detailed dive into everything.
A really really really brief recap of the past fifteen parts
I started in December of 2018 with $1,165 with the goal of making $10,000 in one year. In 2019, I had bought and sold over $40k in baseball, football and various sports trading cards. I had a few great successes ($1,165 into $3,085 before fees - $2,771.20 into $6,200.10 before fees - $1,086.68 into $3,190.54 before fees) and a few duds. I generally sell my cards on ebay, but utilize auction houses every now and then. The biggest bottleneck I face is submitting cards to PSA (a third party grading company), a card might have a 2-4 month turnaround time. To successfully "flip" you need to balance some of these purchases with shorter flips. In 2019, I ended with a final profit of $9,262.28 – a tad bit short of my goal. In 2020, my goal is $20,000 (fitting). Using my margins from 2019, I would need to sell around $85k in cards.
You can find the previous installment here
PERSONAL UPDATE
First, I hope everyone is doing well and staying sane. It has been an absolutely wild three months for me, I found out I’m going to be an uncle, I got a cat and I decided I was going to propose to my girlfriend this weekend! I have still been keeping up with this project, the prices for baseball cards have absolutely skyrocketed over the past couple months, so there hasn’t been the same amount of buying as usual. I am going insane with working from home and trying to keep my head above water with everything, but flipping has been (at times) a nice escape. I am fortunate enough to be flipping something that I am passionate about, baseball cards, so I am able to enjoy this and see a lot of neat cards along the way.
In that spirit I have decided to begin keeping some cards for my personal collection as I go along. I read somewhere an interesting method of collecting, reducing your collection to 25 cards. I wanted to give it a shot with a bit of a twist, I want to keep a collection of 25 cards, but still make a profit along the way. So a couple ground rules I set for myself: * The collection is limited to vintage baseball cards (generally 1980’s and older). This was my first collecting passion and I’d like to try to keep to it.
So, without further ado, here are the first four cards in this project. The 1949 Berra came from the Yogi Berra lot I bought from SCP in January. The grades finally came back last week and I did very well on a few cards, so I felt that I deserved to spoil myself a bit. The 1949 Bowman set holds a special spot in my heart for me, my best flip ever was a group of 1949 Bowman cards I purchased for $300 which included a Jackie Robinson rookie that graded PSA 8! I sold it for over $10k. This Yogi Berra card is well centered, nice registration and a great mid-grade example of a baseball icon. I love it. The Ted Williams card and the Willie Mays both came from the December Heritage lot that I had purchased. PSA took FOREVER on this order. I was a little disappointed in the overall grades, but am confident I will turn a profit. The 1956 Topps Ted Williams is such a cool card and a staple in post-war collecting. The Mays I always liked – it’s a little beat up, but the centering is near perfect and the color looks sharp. Finally, I nabbed the 1969 Yaz. This was mostly done because I love the set. 1969 Topps was the last set to feature Mickey Mantle, something that I think goes underappreciated. The set design has always been pretty crisp, it has a couple great rookies and great all-star rookie cards. I’m a fan. Anyways! None of these cards are permanent, I can sell them at any time, but I’d imagine they will be in the collection a while.
Purchased
What Sold
PSA Update
Here is a link to the Google Doc with the status of all of my PSA cards. The spreadsheet also includes a summary of where the project is.
PSA is still extremely backlogged. For this project, I have 276 items with them. Luckily I was able to get quite a few cards back from them recently! As I previously mentioned, I received back the Yogi Berra cards I sent them in January and the Heritage cards I sent in December. Overall I am happy enough with the grades. I think they were fair on the Berra cards and they were rough on the Heritage cards (they were separate orders). I already listed or consigned these cards, so I will have updates next month on these.
Below is an updated summary:
For items purchased in 2019 (denoted with a “*”), the “cost” column represents the ending 2019 inventory valuation. For items purchased in 2020, the cost column is the cost. In the Google Sheet I included an in-depth P&L with full results and 2019 details.
Item Cost* Sold Fees Inventory^ Profit
1936 Goudey Lot (8) 50.00 56.50 (8.48) - (1.98)
Hank Aaron "Odd-Ball" Collection 150.00 777.29 (116.59) - 510.70
(16) Pre-WWII card lot w/ Cobb 1,300.00 1,708.52 (256.28) - 152.24
(23) Sandy Koufax 1950's and 1960's lot 250.00 299.50 (44.93) - 4.57
1977-1979 Topps Baseball Rack & Cello Packs (6) 250.00 380.00 (57.00) - 73.00
1957 Swift Meats Game Complete Set (18) 800.00 680.00 (102.00) (222.00)
(36) 1950s-2000s Multi-Sports Collection 500.00 1,528.51 (229.28) - 799.23
1933-1989 Wax Pack Wrapper Hoard (650+) 400.00 1,918.01 (287.70) - 1,230.31
1941-2004 Multi-Sport Group (33) 800.00 2,859.83 (428.97) 100.00 1,730.86
1912 B18 Blanket Find (100) 1,270.80 1,136.24 (170.44) 500.00 195.00
1962-63 Parkhurst Hockey Lot (45+) 500.00 287.26 (43.09) 400.00 144.17
1953 to 1969 Mickey Mantle Group (16) 1,000.00 2,747.85 (412.18) 150.00 1,485.67
1956-1959 Baseball Star Collection (48) 1,130.00 322.04 (48.31) 900.00 43.73
1961-1969 Baseball Star Collection (61) 804.95 257.78 (38.67) 600.00 14.16
1948-1965 Yogi Berra Collection (26) 1,400.00 399.50 (59.93) 1,050.00 (10.43)
Lot of (4) Signed Perez-Steele Postcards 676.59 - 676.59 -
1950's-1980's Football Wrapper Lot (42) 920.00 1,944.23 (291.63) 732.60
1953 Topps Partial Set (208) 1,472.00 2,855.13 (428.27) 100.00 1,054.86
1953-55 Dormand Postcard Set (47/52) 685.00 804.85 (120.73) 250.00 249.12
1959 & 1960 Venezuela Topps Lot (34) 216.00 58.66 (8.80) 200.00 33.86
1959 Topps Baseball High Grade Set 1,557.30 1,132.80 (169.92) 1,000.00 405.58
1970 Topps Super Proofs Lot (12) 405.41 493.75 (74.06) 200.00 214.28
1887 Allen & Ginter Boxing Lot (14) 403.40 403.40 -
1954 Topps Starter Set (119/250) 662.22 707.50 (106.13) 500.00 439.16
1947 Bond Bread Jackie Robinson Lot (6) 2,220.00 2,125.00 (318.75) 1,480.00 1,066.25
1934 R310 Butterfinger Ruth & Gehrig Lot (2) 720.00 720.00 -
1959 Topps Baseball Near Set (571/572) 3,620.00 3,620.00 -
1973 Topps Complete Set 2,512.40 6,347.41 (952.11) 600.00 3,482.90
1961 Topps PSA Graded Set 5,791.60 11,445.51 (1,716.83) 100.00 4,037.08
2013 Bowman Chrome Judge Black Wave Auto 1,940.00 1,940.00 -
1961-1982 Signed Card Lot (19) 1,364.40 1,120.00 (168.00) 800.00 387.60
35,772.07 44,393.67 (6,659.05) 16,289.99 18,252.54
*-denotes inventory purchased in 2019 valued at 2019 y/e figures. ^ -inventory on hand is valued at a conservative estimate of fair market value for remaining items. `-grading fees are expensed when the card is sent to PSA, fees are not paid until PSA has completed the order. Fees that are expensed, but not paid are sitting in Accounts Payable below.
2020 Grading Fees`: $2,944.79
Current On Hand
Cash: $5,588.15
Inventory See the Google sheet
ALSO! If anyone is interested in what the financials for this project would look like, see below. With 2019 officially in the book, I moved the final 2019 financial statement over for a year-over-year comparison:
As of 8/25/2020 2020 YTD 2019 Final
Cash $5,588.15 $1,680.15
Accounts Receivable $6,743.43 $-
Inventory^ 16,289.99 $10,605.75
Accounts Payable` ($2,886.54) ($1,858.62)
Retained Earnings ($9,262.28) $-
Initial Capital ($1,165.00) ($1,165.00)
Revenue ($44,393.67) ($40,163.15)
Cost of Goods Sold $19,482.08 $22,582.96
Fees (15% of Rev.) $6,659.05 $5,956.97
Grading Fees $2,944.79 $2,360.93
FORECAST
My goal is $20,000 profit for the year. Right now I’m $15,307.75 – PSA has dramatically slowed turnover, but I am definitely on pace to hit my goal, gross margins are up in 2020 compared to 2019 (56.1% vs. 43.8%) and net margins are also up (34.5% vs 23.1%). Sales more than doubled since the last installment and with orders finally coming back from PSA, I should continue to see steady sales.
I look forward to continuing to update everyone on this. Hope you enjoy as much as I do.
Jason
submitted by MachiavellianFuck to Entrepreneur [link] [comments]

Short Video - Securities Margin Trading in the US - YouTube Day Trading Margin! SHOULD YOU USE IT? Margin Call Calculation Initial Margin Calculation How To Track Your Trades & Build a Proper Trading Plan ...

Using your own money, you could purchase 1,000 shares at $30 per share. If you use margin, you can increase the number of shares you can buy. Let’s say you buy 1,500 shares. At this point your total portfolio with margin would be $45,000, instead of the $30,000 you could’ve bought with just your money. Three free calculators for profit margin, stock trading margin, or currency exchange margin calculations. Also, learn more about the different definitions of margin in finance, experiment with other financial calculators, or explore hundreds of other calculators addressing topics such as math, fitness, health, and many more. 2019 UPDATE: Read my guide to the Best Trading Journals for 2019 with tips on how to successfully maintain your journal. 2017 UPDATE: This spreadsheet page has had well over 100,000 visits so I hired a developer to make a Free Trading Journal right here on StockTrader.com. As of April 2019, StockTrader.com readers log well over 10,000 stock trades each month! Margin Trading: In the stock market, margin trading refers to the process whereby individual investors buy more stocks than they can afford to. Margin trading also refers to intraday trading in India and various stock brokers provide this service. Margin trading involves buying and selling of securities in one single session. Over time, Initial margin: The proportion of total purchase price an investor is supposed to deposit for opening a margin account is referred as its initial margin and is generally 50% of the total value. Maintenance margin: In order to keep the margin account open for doing margin trading, it is necessary to maintain minimum cash or marginable securities

[index] [118] [345] [330] [252] [509] [65] [440] [285] [139] [447]

Short Video - Securities Margin Trading in the US - YouTube

I created this video with the YouTube Slideshow Creator and content image about Margin Call Calculation, margin call ,initial margin ,margin trading ,margin requirements ,margin account ,buying ... Currency traders can use this spreadsheet to analyze any one of the 8 most liquid currencies like a professional. We will show you how to fill out the spread... This IBKR short video will discuss: • How margin trading works for stocks, options, and bonds • Margin requirement mechanics for securities and the key disti... Have you always wondered what it means to trade on margin? In this video, you’ll learn what margin trading is and if it is a strategy that could help you ach... DAY TRADING - THE PROS AND CONS OF USING MARGIN - Duration: 4:53. JoshTheTrader 443 views. ... Trading Journal - My Excel Spreadsheet Trading Journal (+ Free Trading Journal Spreadsheet!)

#